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. the government's promise of a cease-fire. >> i do solemnly swear. >> barack obama is sworn in to the second term. and a brush with fame. troops are working to secure an clear gas pumps. the attackers kidnapped and killed dozens of farm workers. soldiers found another 25 dead hostages on sunday. one security official has at least 81, including captives and attackers. five of the hostage-takers were captured and found alive. they had all been killed in the final assault 20 years of experience in afghanistan, he is claiming his group is behind the attack. >> he is of the brigade. he claims his men launched an attack in eastern algeria, offering to stop if the u.s. releases from prison the man known from the blind shake -- as the blind shake. it is not clear if he took part of the assault or if he survived. he is believed to have been shot on thursday and sent to a news website. algerian bomb disposal teams are searching the plant for explosives and the remains of those killed during saturday's's final assault to freedom. they did recover more bodies on saturday. as many as 25. authorities released
. it'll continue for about 90 minutes. there'll be a panel on improving government performance. we'll have it live for you here on c-span2. yesterday and today johns hopkins university in baltimore has been hosting a summit on reducing gun violence. speakers have included new york city mayor michael bloomberg and maryland governor martin o'malley. this afternoon at 4 eastern they will hold a news conference to release their recommendations for stemming gun violence. we'll have live coverage here on c-span2. again, that will be at 4 p.m. eastern. >>> and right around this time to have year every year governors address their state legislatures on the state of their states. laying out the priorities for the new year. tonight at 7:30 we'll take you live to the kansas statehouse for an address by the state's governor, sam brownback. that'll get underway at 7:30 eastern. >> he had been talking about this dream that he had had. he had talked about it for years, you know? the american dream. and that had become his dream. and he had been in detroit just a few months before, and he had talk
obligations. you can't do that. and that's not a credible way to run this government. we've got to stop lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis, when there's this clear path ahead of us that simply requires some discipline, some responsibility and some compromise. that's where we need to go. that's how this needs to work. major garrett. >> thank you, mr. president. as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. you, yourself, as a member of the senate, voted against a debt ceiling increase. and in previous aspects of american history -- president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush in 1990, president clinton in 1997 -- all signed deficit reduction deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of am
and government reform committee. host: good morning. house members have returned to washington with votes slated later today for emergency aid for victims of superstorm sandy. new york is poised to become the first state to act in response to the mass shooting in newtown, connecticut, keeping guns out of the hands of the mentally ill and banning assault weapons. president obama has in hand to the recommendations from joe biden on gun-control and will push for action. the front page of the washington journal says president obama escalates the fight on the w economy. is the debt ceiling negotiable? your thoughts? send us a tweet or post your comment on facebook. you can also send us an e-mail. president obama held his last official news conference of the first term yesterday in the east room of the white house. here's what he had to say on the debt ceiling debate. [video clip] >> republicans and congress have two choices. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect ransomed in exchange for
said it's an ode to big government and you pointed out in the list, gun control, gay marriage, global warming, he not only wants to lock in every liberal agenda item, but advance it further. will he be successful? second term are notoriously not successful. >> let's add global climate warming on her, climate change. we've already passed this through the congress. it's done. is congress going to pass it? is congress going to tell the states, no, you can't put that past voter i.d. laws? only in it's bipartisan doesn't require amnesty and citizenship. gun control passed, no. i think the president was basically declaring his administration is no longer substantive achievement. it's make the democratic party and making the republicans look more extreme. taking their strength to pass positive items that pile up over in the senate never to be really considered, but give them an agenda, a view that says to the american people he's over there worried about gun control. we're worried about getting jobs. he's over there worried about trying to get gay marriage. we want prosperity for your family
kathy rogers told "political" i think it is possible we would shut down the government to make sure that president obama understands that we're serious. well, i guess that would do it. we always talk about whether or not we're going to kick the can down the road. i think the mood is that we have come to the end of the road. what road? and republican congresswoman marsha blackburn of tennessee said this to msnbc's chris jansing. let me ask you if you're willing to shut the government down? >> we're looking at all the options, there is the option of government shutdown, the option of raising the debt ceiling in short-term increments. i think there is a way to avoid default if it requires shutting down portions of the government. let's look at that. >> and in his press conference, president obama quoted speaker john boehner from 2011. >> that would be a financial disaster, not only for our country but for the worldwide economy. i don't think it is a question that is even on the table. >> and the last question of his press conference, the president was asked if he may be more successful
of government. a set of principles emerged that there is not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll permit and another 10 to 12 minutes, i want to lay out what they are from the perspective of the president. the first foundational principle is there is a second amendment. the president and i support the second amendment that comes with the right of law-abiding responsible citizen to own guns, gives a further protection as well as recreation. the second foundational principle, certain people in society should not and legally can be disqualified from being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens that in fact the vast majority of gun owners comprise. three, we should make common sense judgment about keeping dangerous weapons off our streets. clearly within the purview of the government at the same time recognizing, honoring them being compliant with the second amendment. and for, this isn't just about guns. it is about the coursing of our culture. the coursing of our cult
of the individual and the power of the state. at the time that you're talking about in 1787, the government had muskets and individuals had muskets, there was a very close correlation between the power to use violence on both sides. the other thing that you have to take into account, this is something i haven't heard in this debate, and that is if you look basically to the middle of the 19th century, 1862, the winchester henry rifle, report on that rifle that i just cited in a recent paper showed that it fired 15 rounds in less than ten seconds. the fact of the matter is that repeating technology is 150 years old. and one of the worries here, i think, for people who are on the other side of this is that when we go through this bad gun analysis that there's not really a solid boundary between the current category of assault weapons, parcularly rifles, and any other gun that is out there. >> why ban machine guns then? >> machine guns were banned in 1934 as a result of the national firearms act. >> why not ban the ar-15? >> i think you can make a coherent distinks between semi-automatic firing and
said anybody who is suggesting a government gun grab is all wrong. >> those who oppose any common sense gun control or gun safety measures have a pretty effective way of beginning gwinning up fn the part of gun owners that somehow the federal government is about to take all of your guns away. the nra said they should talk to people buying firearms and ask them why they are buying firearms. september 2012 marked the heist number ever of background checks for gun purchases in the country's history up 50 percent from the december before. >> we heard today from some of the parents of sandy hook. what are they saying? >> sandy hook promise. some say they themselves are gun owners they are comfortable talking about that but want to have a bigger responsibility about gun violence as a whole. they don't want their children's lives to be lost in veiain. they want to see change. >> here is jeremy richmond who lost his young daughter. >> we need to face and take action on hard issues. there is not going to be one simple solution. we feel it is essential to get a deep understanding of mental healt
to that, it is almost entirely health care? >> well, there are examples throughout the federal government where the dollars are not spent wisely. we ought to treat it as other people's money because it is the money earned bit taxpayers and we have an obligation to make sure that we don't continue the wasteful ways of washington. we intend in the house of representatives to promote an agenda that allows for getting spending under control, not just in the health care area but in many other arenas, where even the gao has pointed out again and again there is a lot of room for improvement to rid the system of waste, fraud, and abuse. >>neil: do you think as the president makes his way to the reviewing stand, he is feet from us, literally, from where i am, before he moves to the review youing stand, do you think he is seizing on what he thinks is the advantage over congress and your popularity, collectively, republicans, sir, and he will get his way because you guys have not found yours. what do you say? >> listen, we are in the majority in the house of representatives because the voters of our
limit is a sign of leadership failure, it's a sign that the u.s. government can't pay its own bills, it's a sign that we now depend on ongoing financial assistance from foreign countries to finance our government's reckless fiscal policies. leadership means that the buck stops here. instead, washington is shifting the burden of bad choices today on the backs of our children and grandchildren, therefore intend to oppose the effort to increase america's debt limit. in 2008, candidate obama blamed president bush and called the growing debt unpatriotic. >> number 43 added 4 trillion dollars by his lonesome so that we now have over 9 trillion dollars of debt that we are going to have to pay back, $30,000 for every man, woman and child, that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> mike: unpatriotic. 9 trillion dollars in debt 2008. we're 16 1/2 trillion dollars in debt today. all right. joining me now, former house speaker newt gingrich. mr. speaker, great having you with me tonight. [applause] >> good to be with you, governor. i must say that was a terrific lead-in and one i kind of wish the
were forced to limit the growth of their government. every state has prisons, schools but they find a way to fund those for less. those nine states gained population from other states, increase jobs four point* 9%. the other states declined. competition between neighboring states keeps them from indulging. new hampshire kept vermont politicians from going crazy. the existence of arizona and nevada teacher the california legislator from going crazy. they still do despite so many people moving. but it is good we have places like texas. smaller government means >> gregg: fox news alert on the hostage crisis in algeria this hour where the fate of captive americans are not clear. two unarmed predator drones have been on the scene in the middle of the sahara flying over the gas facility taken over by al-qaeda fighters three days ago. on the ground, a bloody conclusion could be playing out right now. algerian forces have stormed the complex calling it a final assault. sources telling fox news the situation might not be over yet. hello, i'm gregg jarrett. glad you are with us. welcome to am
government said the raid was over u.s. officials insist it is ongoing. at least five americans managed to escape. as for the others -- >> in interest of their security, i am not going to provide any further details. >> michael: this is all happening less than 48 hours before president obama is sworn in for his second time. an issue that has been largely quiet for the last four years. joining us now for a joining us now for a perspective on the situation is he's the author of "leading from behind: the reluctant president and the advisors who decide for him". he comes to us from washington. richard, welcome inside "the war room." >> thank you. >> michael: i want to -- i want to ask you about the hostage situation. it's focused american attention on an issue that -- you know, that frankly hasn't had its focus for a while. what can you tell us about, you know, what is happening there, and how it affects america? >> well one of the things that this shows is that ignorance is dangerous. the united states ignored afghanistan in the 1990s and we saw what came out of that.
will meet our obligation to pass a budget on time, moderate spending, pay bills and keep the government running. most importantly, there will be a plan to slowly, but surely walk our nation out of debt, deficit and declined. on your behalf, we will insist that the democrats to run the rest of washington do the same. this debate is often argued in numbers and figures, but it is really about families like yours that bear the burden of a slow economy, constant uncertainty, and ever-changing government rules that chase jobs and opportunity overseas. one day to day life costs more, and jobs pay less, we do not solve the problem by delaying decisions, raise taxes, or refusing to tackle the most pressing economic challenges. you deserve better. with the swearing in of a new congress and the inauguration of president obama, this is the opportunity for a fresh start, but because government debt affects all of us, republicans will not simply provide a blank check for uncontrolled spending , a rational borrowing, and constant nickel and dime tax increases. the issues that we face today are not an
they are afraid they will spy on them and report information back to the federal government. host: let's go back to what you said at the beginning when you talk about the politics of this. this headline -- that was in reference to what harry reid had said. some democrats backing down from an assault weapons ban. dianne feinstein but to introduce her assault weapons ban in the 113th congress. chris in washington, independence. -- independent. caller: i'm against any more legislation on guns. it's nonsense. we are back to demonizing inanimate objects. if we want to get rid of things that are deadly, ban the automobile. this is nonsense. brady.ed this with a g it did not work. it did not lower crime. that's not the issue. host: what is the issue and where do you see compromise? caller: i don't see compromise. why should this even be an issue? it is a media-driven emergency. other than that, there is none. host: the new york times front page story -- we will go next to dennis in upper marlboro, maryland, democratic caller. caller: good morning. thank you for the opportunity, first of all. the gentle
to gather dust on the shelf, of some agency, in government, a set of principles emerged, that there was not universal agreement on, but overall whelming consensus on, and they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you'll permit me about another 10-12 minutes, i want to lay out to you what they are from the perspective of the president and me. the first foundational principle is, there is a second amendment. the president and i support the second amendment. and it comes with the right of law-abiding, responsible citizens to own guns. use it for their protection as well as for recreation. the second foundational principle, certain people in society should not, and legally can be disqualified from, being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens that in fact the vast majority of gun owners x-ray. -- owners comprise. three, we should make commonsense judgments about keeping dangerous weapons off our streets. clearly within the purview of the government, at the same time recognizing, honoring, and being compliant wit
lowered their expectations -- there's always debate about what the proper role of government ought to be. i suspect it will have more of that in the coming days about what the proper role government should be -- what are our expectations? are they too low? some of my friends on the right will see the opposite -- the expectations of government are too high. talk to me about expectations -- what do we have a right to the world? >> i think it is important what they were saying about what should be done -- it is not theory, it is actually being done in countries around the world with demonstrated, proven results. every child in many countries in europe start out with that preschool. the results are that unlike this country, there is not hereditary poverty. it is proven -- this is not a theory. what you are saying about the health system is completely proven. our health system costs an extra $750 billion a year for exactly the same services that you would get in other countries. at the institute of medicine issued a report that the waste and fraud that comes from this for-profit system is 5%
government and federal programs. because federal government is funding 40% of the health care in this country. so we have big savings in health care. we have big savings for the federal government. discretionary savings, the speaker proposed 300 billion over 10 years. again, if we put that in context are going to spend $11.6 trillion over the next 10 years. so that would represent a savings of 2.6%. as judd indicated we've already had and the budget control act 900 billion of savings, so there are substantial savings that have already occurred in this area. but we can do another 300 billion. we could save another 2.6%. other mandatory, that's the other major category. again, speaker proposed $200 billion over 10 years. we are going to spend $11 trillion -- i'm sorry, $511 trillion in this category over the next 10 years. so that represents a 10 a savings of 4%. you know, what have we become as a country if we can't make a 4% change? really, that is something we should be able to do. so under the compromise that i proposed, taking the speakers numbers, taking the president's revenue, you can s
additional tax incentives. finally, and most important, we should have the federal government lead by example. the department of energy's management of four large marketing agency should be the gold standard for integrating renewables into the grid, upgrading transmission capacity and leading on conservation. the g.s.a., with over 300 million square feet of federal office space, should demand that all our facilities, every one we at least buy or build, should be of the highest energy efficiency. the federal fleet should be on the cutting edge of fuel efficiency standards. and finally, the department of defense, the largest consumer of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a tim
. according to algerian government officials, they are saying that both militants and foreign hostages were killed in today's final attack. the government just in the past two hours or so are coming up with what they call is provisional final death figures. 32 militants they say were killed in the four-day siege and 23 hostages including foreigners. as for the americans we were were just talking to the state department. they are still not putting out numbers. we know that one person died. he from texas. we have been reporting five americans had escaped and we believed the two remaining americans, this is as of last night, were still being held. today the reuters news agency says two americans were freed today but we have no confirmation and no one sells saying that. leon panetta is in london today and has stern words about those he feels was behind this attack. >> at 9/11 we made very clear that nobody is going to attack the united states of america and get away with it. for that reason we have made a commitment that we're going to go after al-qaeda wherever they are. >> reporter: he was as
is all about. people who maintain an almost total skepticism about what government can accomplish for the good of this country. he talked about all the good things government does, whether it's education or it's a safety net or it's regulation when it has to be done in terms of big business. he launched all those good reasons and then he said, of course, there are people who retain a reasonable skepticism about the role of government in this country. that debate is going to continue. i thought that was an amazing effort. he's not going to win any support from the tea party. he might win though, the congressman may know better, he might be able to make some of the people who represent the suburbs who are not so far right realize this guy is not their enemy. he is somewhat to their left but he's probably as reasonable as anybody to their right in terms of politics these days. >> chris -- >> i think the battle today is between people that want government to function, want the debate to continue, and people that want to take their ball and go home and end government, shut it down, use
, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down the list. it was a progressive case, but it wasn't necessarily a big government case. saying there's a mix of -- >> let's talk about some examples. i think you know them. the right wing ideas of rights is leave me alone, i got enough guns here in this house to hold you off for a couple days anyway if the government comes in with helicopters. progressives' idea of rights is a couple young people would like to go to the university of mississippi. it took the federal troops to go in there to get them in the door. a governor named george wallace tried to stop people at the door at the university of alabama, they had to be pushed aside. that's an aggressive communitarian notio
these people -- caller: all these people who are paranoid to think the government is going to take their guns, they probably use a psychological evaluation. if the government wants to take your guns and your assault weapon isn't going to stop them from doing that. a second opinion is, i hear everyone talk about regulating and background checks on handguns, but what about background checks on ammunition and that would cut back criminals. host: i appreciate your time. mental health issue must be handled very carefully. a counselor and nurse should be on every public school site, not guns. and joseph asked, should ptsd prevent owning a firearm. rick on our republican line. what are your thoughts? caller: i appreciate you taking my call. i am a republican, i'm a gun owner, former n.r.a. member and i'm also treated for depression. host: why a former n.r.a. member? caller: the day after the presidential election, i was contacted by the n.r.a. -- if you know anything about the n.r.a., if you are a member, they do contact you quite often, mail, via phone calls, asking for money. and more money. and w
of government to regulate guns, but they also put a definite boundary on how far those can go. so an outright ban on handguns like we had in chicago before, like washington, d.c. had, that goes too far. whether the second amendment right goes as far as to extend the right of self-defense that the supreme court found that you have in the home to when you leave the home is another question spirally. entirely. and i think, ultimately, probably the what happens in congress is not going to be greatly affected, is not going to be greatly constrained by what the supreme court is going to allow. i think the court on things like regulation of particular types of guns, waiting periods, background checks and things like that is, will probably be willing to -- we'll probably be willing to allow that sort of thing. >> i wallet you all to know that -- i want you all to know that i've opinion sending mash notes to my wife who's away. [laughter] i know this is a big appointment for you every day, you may not see nightly news tonight, but chuck todd actually had a report on what the president's going to recom
in 2010 claiming that armstrong defrauded the government by taking sponsorship money from the u.s. postal service. the justice department has until thursday to decide whether or not it wants to join the lawsuit. "politico" reports that the postal service gave armstrong's cycling people more than $30 million. if armstrong loses the lawsuit against him, he could be required to pay three times that amount. landes filed the suit on behalf of the government. there is a lot of reason to dislike wal-mart but they are doing some good today. it plans to hire every veteran who wants a job as long as he or she left the military in this past year and was honorably discharged. we're back after the break. stay with us. ♪ right have, about the "heavy hand of government" ... i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really? you're going to lay people off because now the government is going to help you fund your healthcare. really? i want to have those conversations, not to be confrontational, but to understand what the other side is saying, and i'd like to arm ou
of some agency in government, a set of principles emerge that there was not universal agreement on, but overwhelming consensus on. they were the foundation of the recommendations. if you will permit me another 10-12 minutes, i want to lay out to you what they are from the perspective of the president the first foundational principles is there is a second amendment. -- from the perspective of the president and me. it comes with the right of law- abiding responsible citizens who own guns. the second foundational principles, certain people in society should not and can be disqualified from being able to own a gun because they are unstable or they are dangerous. they are not the citizens but the vast majority of gun owners comprise. 3, we should make common sense judgments about keeping dangerous weapons off of our streets. clearly within the purview of the government, at the same time recognizing, honoring, and being compliant with the second amendment. four, this is not just about guns. it is about our culture. whether it is with video games, movies, or behavior. it is about the abil
: will america buy that we the people is now we the government. we will report. you will decide. >>brian: one guy i know does buy it. it looks like he'll have his media in the corner with the president of the united states. this network executive heard an article telling the president to pulverize and destroy republicans. you can go for their throats. we see him sunday with bob schieffer. we can't make this up. we'll review it only for you on "fox & friends." >>steve: it is the coldest day of the winter so far here in new york city. that is why it was a good decision to go indoors today. >>gretchen: you know even though i grew up in minnesota, i hate the cold weather. so let's pretend it is 90 degrees and go for it. >>brian: yesterday 600,000 people happy yesterday was a little warmer. it was at a minimum 800,000 shy from four years prior. the balls that followed, the parade that ensued. it's always a great day in america. >>gretchen: for me, beyonce. i see that you and i slept together again last night. >>brian: do you mean purple? >>gretchen: sure. let's do headlines. three americans were unfor
, like we will be this year there's something different. governing is already under way. the president has started some things that he intends to finish in his second term. sort of a sense of continuity, well informed expectation about what kind of president this is going to be and where he is likely to go. when president obama was inaugurated. first time, there was none of that certainty and expectation, right? the country and all of us were caught up in the historical enormity of the fact that the united states of america was about to swear in our first african-american president. and that eight years of republican administration under bush and cheney was coming to an end. that inauguration in 2009 was such a dramatic break from the past, toward a whole new future that i don't think anybody expects that we will have an inauguration quite as consequential as the last one. maybe ever again. but we now know, as part of the historical record, that while the whole country was marveling at the enormity of the transition we were making on inauguration night 2009 something else was going on
, it all boils down to there's a very different vision when you're talking about a government that takes about 23%, 24% of gdp and one at 20%, 21% like budget chairman ryan proposed. as we began this debate, they can't even agree on where we start because democrats believe we've already cut $1.7 trillion to $3 trillion all from domestic and defense, nondefense discretionary spending which, of course, that's not true. >> wait a minute. >> $3 trillion in discretionary -- >> no, $1.5 trillion is how the cbo. >> republicans will give you $900 billion and cbo -- you canted even agree where you're starting. >> that is a problem. >> true. but if -- what does it tell you that the ryan budget had essentially no medicare savings in the first ten years? in other words, you have a contest to cut entitlements, and the republicans say to the president, put some cuts on the table. democrats say the reverse, but we haven't seen them from anybody. >> she needs no introduction. that, of course, the first lady of the united states, michelle obama. she has changed her hairstyle. there will be a twitter poll
a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to bring an end to the petty grievances and false promises in washington. now four years later was that a false promise? >> yes. i mean, the president, i think, understandably confident and an historic election and all of that perhaps overstated what could be done. this is one place where he seen having come fiercely short and it's in bringing that sense to washington of bipartisanship and of working together and overcoming partisanship and his defenders and supporters will say oh, the republicans have been intransient and smal
the debt limit as the government faces another shut down possibly within weeks. will that happen? >> we need to stop spending. we need to reduce spending. but it would be better if we figure out how to do that in a targeted way, rather than across the board way. look what mommy is having. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant martha: all right. there was a frightening scene after a plane blew out four tires landing. it happened at newark airport. 13 people were onboard this plane. it was a flight from rochester, new york, to newark. reports are that nobody was hurt. we'll continue to keep a look at that situation. we'll let you know if there is any information on that. looks like everybody is okay. scary situation though. bill: republican senator roy blunt said president obama was confrontational in his first term. tell
a sequestration cuts scheduled to start march 1. the current resolution running the government also running out into her three months from now. as well as, the debt ceiling having to be raised yet again. republicans hope this is when they will be able to get the leverage to push spending cuts and entitlement reform. neil: you know, peter, what we look at -- how does that decide? there is a protocol. sitting in and around that i see ron emanuel sitting close to president clinton, how are those seats sold out? >> by protocol and tradition, all former presidents are invited, of course. both president bush, 41 and 43 the client to come. i believe president carter is not attending, but president lyndon is. then, of course -- neil: carter is there. peter: okay. neil: i only saw that because i saw his picture. peter: other seats are given out by the committee. then there are seats that are doled out by congressional offices. about 1500 folks get to sit up there on the big landing on the west front of the capitol. neil: all right. peter, thank you very much. this is all behind the president right now.
the government's bills. >> please have a seat. >> reporter: president obama spoke from the white house to stake out a position on the debt limit. if congress doesn't improve an increase the government will run out of money to pay bills. president obama blasted republicans who said they won't raise it without dollar for dollar cuts to the budget. >> the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a deadbeat nation. >> the problem is congress has already spent the money. what it would mean for the nation to not make payments. >> social security checks and veteran's benefits will be delayed. we might not be able to pay our troops. >> reporter: in response republicans pointed out president obama voted against increasing the debt limit as a senator. speaker of the house john boehner's office said debt is endangering's children future. theconsequences are real he said. >> the debate had a numbing effect on wall street today. the dow is up 18 to 13,507. the nasdaq is down 8 at 3,117. the s&p is down 1 at 1,470. >>> all of that in washington is being watched closely in sacramento b
the government accountable to the people. few of us agree with everything that is done or spoken under protection of our first amendment rights, our freedom of the press. but as a son of vermont printers and publishers, you can bet that i have very serious concerns about the press being shut out. of course i oppose the disclosure of properly classified government information, but i think we have to make sure that legislative efforts to protect or prevent classified leaks don't ink fringe upon our fundamental freedoms, including the freedom of the press. and there i might say to the administration as i have said to past administrations, don't overclassify things. don't put a classification on everything that you do, including those things where you want to cover your mistakes. this is an open and free country. let's keep it that way. so i'll keep pushing to update our privacy laws, to address emerging technology and the internet, including the electronic communications privacy act. we have to re-authorize satellite, tv licenses. we have to make most accessible for those with visual disabilities. w
, expansive government." the chairwoman of the house republican conference said "the president's out word words must be matched with actions regarding the country's fiscal health," suggesting a gulf between the two." good morning, your thoughts on the inaugural address? caller: i thought that it was wonderful. i thought that the speech was very insightful. the keylieve that's words were we the people. together we will do all the things we set out to do. host: he talked about preserving medicare, social security. he talked about climate change, equal rights for gay couples and women. is that your priority list? caller: maybe not in that order, but the president has a hard job and congress has got to work together with him. i believe that we have good republicans. many people in the country believed in the position of the president and that the congress will go along, eventually. host: all right, douglas. your priority list? top five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on
of the federal government, trying to react to newtown in a sensible way. new york has a tough piece of legislation that are expanding their assault weapons ban. they're expanding the reporting requirements that owners who have assault weapons or assault-type weapons are going to have to register those weapons. there is a mental health component that requires psychiatrists to report people with guns who they believe, to be mentally unstable. so this is kind of a wide and a broad package that was negotiated over a period of several weeks. they pushed it through last night. it is going to get approved today. and it is shocking to hear in all of the reports the opposition in new york is minimized. you had 18 senators who voted against this package. they didn't speak on the floor. they just voted against it. the momentum at least in new york is certainly on the side of reducing gun violence. ten other states, states like massachusetts, maryland, illinois colorado, are look at now similar efforts. how do you restrict these military-style weapons? how do you restrict the high-capacity maga
that we do what we can as a federal and as state governments to protect our citizens is primary. >> schieffer: you're going to have a pretty important job coming up here shortly once john kerry is confirmed as secretary of state. every indication is that he will be. you're going to have to appoint somebody to replace him. >> i've heard that, (laughs) >> pelley: give us a clue. >> no clues today other than it will be somebody who is aligned with the president's ageneral the, will be a good partner to the president and the majority leader, which is important. i always remind our citizens back theme the main event is not the interim appointee, it's the election of a new senator in the special election. that's what we need to focus on. >> schieffer: i take it will be a democrat? >> it will be a democrat. the. >> pelley: governor patrick, thank you for joining us. we have in the capitol rotunda a very special guest today, valerie jarrett, senior advisor to the president and i day air is the person in washington who has known the president and first lady longest, being a long-time fri
are approaching a number of other fiscal critical watersheds coming up. we have the funding of the government, the so-called sequester, number of spending cuts that were laid as part of the fiscal cliff of arrangement. and we have the infamous debt ceiling that will come into play. we will see a lot of activity in the next few months, debates about the purpose of the government, about the size of the deficit, and a lot of back- and-forth over these three issues. i want to say one word about the debt ceiling. not many people understand what the debt ceiling is about. raising the debt ceiling, which congress has to do periodically, gives the government the ability to pay its existing bills. it doesn't create new deficits. it does not create new spending. so not raising the debt ceiling is sort of like a family, which is trying to improve its credit rating, shane, i know how we can improve our credit rating. we will pay your credit card bills. that is not the best way to improve your credit rating. all of these issues are important, but it is very important that congress take necessary action to
syria, with continued bombings by government planes and clashes between troops and anti-government rebels. the obama administration is continuing its push to rally support for sweeping plan to address gun violence. on thursday, vice-president joe biden called for action before hundreds of u.s. mayors gathered in washington, d.c. foreign annual meeting. in his address, biden referenced the shooting rampage in newtown, connecticut that claimed the lives of 20 children, six school staff, and the shooter's mother. >> we have to do something. i hope we all agree there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot continue to be tolerated. that tragedy in all my years of public life i think is -- has affected the public psyche in a way i have never seen before. >> a new poll affirms vice president joe biden's claim about the impact of new town, finding it affected the public opinion on guns or deeply than other shootings. a new poll says 54% of americans believe gun co
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